7 Travel Destinations That are Actually Economic Ideas

Whether you have tried going to Moscow to see the Swan Lake, or just visited Stockholm for the Christmas carols at Skansen, there are travel destinations that will make you rethink – and think about your travel not only in budget-saving terms, but also in terms of getting the travel value right.

Lucas Islands, Princess Elizabeth Land

While Lucas island is a charming island on Antarctica full of penguins administered under the Antarctic Treatry System, the island itself was only mapped in 1936-1937 by  Lars Christensen Expedition and called “Plogsteinen” (the plow stone), later being renamed.

Lucas Islands model, however, is not referring to Princess Elizabeth Land. Instead, it is a land of economics, linking money supply and prie and output changes, driving on rational expectations theory. The quantity theory of money will indeed be useful when planning your trip to  Antarctica, as the budget tips and tricks for your next travel will not be money neutral. To have an effective proposition on money budgeting, please consult the article on budget travel tips.

Stockholm, Sweden

Stockholm is well known for its subway art, as well as ABBA and Vasa Museum. But what about Stockholm school of thought? Stockholmsskolan, led by Wicksell and Keynes, believes in Scandinavian happiness levels can be achieved by adjusting travel budgets to your pocket. So, when going on your next trip, save some money before it gets hot and travel spending comes around!

Travel to Mars by Overshoot

Did SpaceX intend to overshoot to Mars? While the talk around Tesla is always an interesting one, overshooting to Mars can become a reality pretty soon. Overshooting, however, in near future, cannot be the best solution. To travel and really get to Mars, the real exchange of travel expense and experience novelty will need to be balanced out with the previously assumed, so the travellers are stable with their wants, needs and expenses. After all, the way to Mars is a long one!

Swan Island, Tasmania

While Swan Island, a part of Waterhouse island on the coast of Tasmania is known for its seal parties and little penguins, and less for swans themselves, the island has a vast variety of seabird and wader species. Swan model, however, focuses on bringing the travellers out of work depression (Read: why travel is necessary for your mental health) by balancing external and internal positions of economy.

Baikal, Russia and Mongolia –  the Largest Freshwater Lake in the World

Baikal is the largest freshwater lake by volume in the world, and travelling to Russia just to visit the rift valley lake in Siberia is worth it. While freshwater reserves are important to any country and will determine the future climate in the world, the Sweetwater school of rationality would reaffirm that, opposite to Saltwater Keynesian economics, travel spending and failures from time to time can be either a bust situation, or a solution to a problem. So remember on your next trip – not a person can have valuable travel experience without being taken aback by some of the travel experiences.

Matching, United Kingdom

Escape to a countryside sometimes is just what you need. Matching near Harlow in United Kingdom will give you not only a pleasant fresh breath of air, but also knowledge, as not afar from Cambridge. The economic thought being the matching theory, or search theory, maintains that travellers form mutually beneficial relationships over time, be it solo traveler finding a travel companion in hostel in Hanoi, or a senior traveller travelling Spain with common interest in museums friends group.

Vienna, Austria

From Mozart chocolate balls selling in Saltzburg to Viennese Midsummer concerts in the Schönbrunn Palace, Austria is full of discoveries for both foodies and culture travellers. Austrian school of economics, also, maintains, that music movements and developments are made by individuals. Geniuses like Mozart are responsible for movement forward, and economics is no exception.

Browse. Book. Stay.

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